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(I’m in the middle; at my study abroad end-of-semester party, AKA “prom,” 2006) 
Things I learned while studying abroad:
how to get un-lost in London after crying alone in a train station
an appreciation for beer, wine, and tiny bottles of Jager
how little French I actually understood
the pros of low-cut v-necks, which i have since fully embraced
a lot about European history and German fairy tales
how to depend fully on myself and be independent 

(I’m in the middle; at my study abroad end-of-semester party, AKA “prom,” 2006) 

Things I learned while studying abroad:

  • how to get un-lost in London after crying alone in a train station
  • an appreciation for beer, wine, and tiny bottles of Jager
  • how little French I actually understood
  • the pros of low-cut v-necks, which i have since fully embraced
  • a lot about European history and German fairy tales
  • how to depend fully on myself and be independent 
Quote
"Here’s the thing: I lose sleep because of you. Every week. Before I tell you why, you should understand the truth about school. You see, the main event of school is not academic learning. It never has been. It never will be. And, if you find someone who is passionate in claiming that it is about academics, that person is lying to himself or herself and may genuinely believe that lie. Yes, algebra, essay writing, Spanish, the judicial process — all are important and worth knowing. But they are not the MAIN event. The main event is learning how to deal with the harshness of life when it gets difficult — how to overcome problems as simple as a forgotten locker combination, to obnoxious peers, to gossip, to people doubting you, to asking for help in the face of self-doubt, to pushing yourself to concentrate when a million other thoughts and temptations are fingertips away. It is your resilience in conquering the main event — adversity — that truly prepares you for life after school. Because, mark my words, school is not the most challenging time you will have in life."

What Students Really Need to Hear | affectiveliving (via apsies)

(via apsies)

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(Source: popculturebrain, via lizdexia)

Quote
"I don’t really believe in cars, but I drive one every day and I love that it gets me places and makes life so much easier and faster and I don’t know what I would do without it."

Amy Poehler, being a genius about women who don’t believe in feminism. (via meredithhaggerty)

(via shorterexcerpts)

Photoset

heloiseagrippina:

"Costumes are also used to show Mr. Darcy’s evolution as he comes to love Elizabeth Bennet and let go of his snobbery. His costume had a series of stages. The first time we see him he’s at Meryton, where he has a very stiffly tailored jacket on, and he’s quite contained and rigid. He stays in that rigid form for the first part of the film.
By the time we get to the proposal that goes wrong in the rain, we move to a similar cut, but a much softer fabric. And then later he’s got a completely different cut of coat, not interlined, and he wears it undone.
The nth degree is him walking through the mist in the morning, completely undressed by 18th-century standards. It’s absolutely unlikely, but then Lizzie’s in her nightie, so what can you say?

(Jacqueline Durran, Costume designer)

All is well about costumes.  So, well, I know what I want to watch tonight.

compositional I MISS EWE.

I MISS YOU TOO. 

(Source: pemberley-state-of-mind)

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"After some 30 years of [analyzing teaching], I have concluded that classroom teaching—particularly at the elementary and secondary levels—is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. In fact, when I compared the complexity of teaching with that much more highly rewarded profession, “doing medicine,” I concluded that the only time medicine even approaches the complexity of an average day of classroom teaching is in an emergency room during a natural disaster. When 30 patients want your attention at the same time, only then do you approach the complexity of the average classroom on an average day."

The wisdom of practice: essays on teaching, learning and learning to teach Lee S. Shulman (via luckyseventeen)

(via iamlittlei)

Quote
"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via fivecentwisdom)

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(Source: ibmblr, via shorterexcerpts)

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heloiseagrippina:

compositional
Thank you!!!!!!!!! This picture is the greatest thing I’ve seen all day, and I had a classroom filled with balloons this morning.

heloiseagrippina:

compositional

Thank you!!!!!!!!! This picture is the greatest thing I’ve seen all day, and I had a classroom filled with balloons this morning.
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WHO ARE YOU?! (AKA a summary of what I thought my relationship with Courtney was about…)

heloiseagrippina:

compositional replied to your post:Oh my God
You didn’t know that? How did you not know that? :/ I now question the basis of our friendship.

A) Do you actually like Pride and Prejudice?  (The Keira version.)

B) Do you actually appreciate Titanic? (You gave it to me for my bday, if I recall correctly….I still watch it when Lincoln and I miss you.)

C) Do you or do you not still think of me when you hear that dramatic song between Mark and Roger in Rent, reminiscent of that time I came home totally drunk to you watching that movie and complained that our roommate relationship was not as meaningful, at which point you said you would go sing to me on the roof if I wanted you to, and that meant the world to me????

A) OF COURSE I DO. I still watch it when I miss you, and talk to the tv like a weirdo. Nobody appreciates that movie like we do. 

B) Duh. It is ridiculously amazing - but I don’t actually own it myself so it’s been a while. 

C) I would sing to you on the roof every day. 

Quote
"What counts, in the long run, is not what you read; it is what you sift through your own mind; it is the ideas and impressions that are aroused in you by your reading."

— Eleanor Roosevelt (via likearegularbookworm)

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"I dunno, just laying face down on the couch and waiting for some baby boomers to die, I guess"

— Millennials, when asked about plans for the future (via alwaysfaithfulterriblelizard)

(Source: hermione-ganja, via kelsium)

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everyfiredies:

englishmajorinrepair:

*teaches study group students good essay planning/writing techniques/strategies*

*proceeds to ignore all of them as I write my own essay*

Teaches students how to organize binder so as not to lose stuff.

Loses everything.

Constantly preaches to kids about the importance of good time management and not procrastinating.

Literally puts everything off to the last possible minute.

Quote
"Sometimes I remind myself that I almost skipped the party, that I almost went to a different college, that the whim of a minute could have changed everything and everyone. Our lives, so settled, so specific, are built on happenstance."

— Every Last One (Anna Quindlen)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via my-quarterlifecrisis)

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"Humans now are trained to scan for the most important bits of information and move on, like how we read online. But that’s not how you’re supposed to read Moby Dick, or Middlemarch. Longer sentences require concentration and attention, not a break to check Twitter every 45 seconds. The Internet, and how it has changed our reading habits, is making it difficult for people, particularly young people, to read classic works of literature because our brains are trained to bob and weave from one piece of writing to the next. And 600 pages is just so many pages, you know? Pagination is like, the worst thing to happen to my life, and without a “Read All” option? Melville definitely needed a UX developer."

The Internet Is Probably Ruining Your Life, Marriage - The Wire (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)